Archive for the ‘Native Hawaiian’ Tag

U.S. Dept. of Interior requests comments on Native Hawaiian and United States relationship

For the record, the U.S. Dept. of Interior will start a long series of public meetings “in Hawaii and Indian Country,” at 9 a.m., tomorrow, June 23, 2014, at the Hawaii State Capitol, to consider “whether and how the process of reestablishing a government-to-government relationship should move forward,” according to a June 18 Department press release.

The Dept. of Interior is soliciting comments and feedback on “Procedures to Reestablish a Government-to-Government Relationship with the Native Hawaiian Community,” Regulation Identifier Number 1090-AB05.

The complete schedule of public meetings is listed at the end of this post.

The Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM), made available on June 19 June 20 in the Federal Register, outlines “five threshold questions” that the Department of Interior wants addressed.

While attendance at consultation meetings is not required for public comment—other procedures are described in the press release at the bottom of this post— Native Hawaiians and others interested are encouraged to attend these meetings because they are the first and prime opportunity to be heard by the U.S. and because they will be educational in terms of what is legal under international law.

Leaders and members of the Native Hawaiian community and federally recognized Indian tribes, Hawaii state agencies, and the general public including citizens of Ka Lahui Hawaii are expected to comment. The questions stated in the June 18 press release of the Department of Interior, that were previously reported in this post, were updated in the June 20 Federal Register, that is, the questions are not the same. Please refer to the Federal Register

The meetings are scheduled as follows:

Public Meetings in Hawaii – June 23 through July 8, 2014

Oahu

Monday, June 23 — Honolulu – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium

Monday, June 23 — Waimanalo – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Waimanalo Elementary and Intermediate School

Tuesday, June 24 — Waianae Coast – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Nanaikapono Elementary School

Wednesday, June 25 — Kaneohe – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Heeia Elementary School

Thursday, June 26 — Kapolei – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Makakilo Elementary School

Lanai

Friday, June 27 — Lanai City – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Lanai Senior Center

Molokai

Saturday, June 28 — Kaunakakai – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Kaunakakai Elementary School

Kauai

Monday, June 30 — Waimea – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Waimea Neighborhood Center

Tuesday, July 1 — Kapaa – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Kapaa Elementary School

Hawaii Island

Wednesday, July 2 — Hilo – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Keaukaha Elementary School

Thursday, July 3 — Waimea – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Waimea Community Center

Thursday, July 3 — Kona – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Kealakehe High School

Maui

Saturday, July 5 — Hana – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Hana High and Elementary School

Monday, July 7 — Lahaina – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
King Kamehameha III Elementary School

Tuesday, July 8 — Kahului – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Pomaikai Elementary School

Indian Country Consultations – July 29 through August 7, 2014

Tuesday, July 29 — Minnesota – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, Prior Lake, MN

Wednesday, July 30 — South Dakota – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Rushmore Civic Center, Rapid City, SD

Friday, August 1 — Washington – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Tulalip Resort, Seattle, WA

Tuesday, August 5 — Arizona – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Talking Stick Resort, Scottsdale, AZ

Thursday, August 7 — Connecticut – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Mohegan Sun, Uncasville, CT

To submit comments without attending a meeting, please see the Department of Interior’s press release in full (click on this link):

The news release from the U.S. Department of Interior

Posted by Rebekah

Advertisements

Lono i ka Makahiki!

Aloha! Pehea oe? Recall that Makahiki season is here! In Hawaii citizens still observe the festival that runs roughly from mid-October to mid-February. Check the sky at night, and you’ll see the Makalii constellation (Pleiades) overhead at 8 p.m. Work is pau, the food has been harvested. People play sports, play games, have ceremonies honoring Lono, the god of agriculture and harvesting. Warring ceases; the time of Ku is passed. Many other indigenous cultures observe this time of year similarly as winter approaches and families visit and entertain each other with good relaxing times.

Today my ohana plans to attend Makahiki Festivities at Queen Liliuokalani Children’s Center, 53-516 Kamehameha Highway, in Punaluu, Oahu. Protocol began at sunrise, so we’ve missed that. However, the games for all ages begin at 9 a.m., and they are open to the public. I suggest you find out what might be going on in your area, or come to Punaluu, or organize some festivities yourself. Enjoy!

Posted by Rebekah  

Native-Hawaiian-made films

Just alerting readers of the Oiwi Film Festival opening today at The Honolulu Academy of Arts Doris Duke Theatre. It features the collective voices of Native Hawaiian filmmakers and runs through May 26. Tickets are affordable at $8 with a dollar off for students, seniors and military. If you’re a member of the Academy of Arts, five bucks gets you in. The programmers grouped the films into several themes:

Na alakai o Hawaii nei — Those who lead us in Hawaii
Ka malama ana i ka aina — Caring for our land
Ka pilina o ka poe Hawaii i ke kai — Hawaiians’ relationship to the sea
Ka ea Hawaii —Sovereignty
Na moolelo pokole — Short stories
Na hula o Hawaii — Hula, dance of Hawaii
Ka hoohanohano ana i ko kakou mau kupuna — Honoring our ancestors

Do check the schedule for which films are showing when. There are 19 short subjects and features. I found a comprehensive news-feature article and film festival schedule by reporter Gary C.W. Chun on the following link:

http://www.starbulletin.com/features/20100502_their_views.html

If you go, you can post your film review here to share. Click on “Leave a comment.”

Posted by Rebekah

Good list of links on our blogroll

To ease your search for information about more Native Hawaiian activities, see our blogroll in the sidebar at right (scroll down). Ka Huli Ao already provides a comprehensive list of resources, so start there. Mahalo!

Posted by Rebekah

Ka Lahui Hawaii’s master plan for Hawaiian sovereignty

A master plan for Hawaiian sovereignty prepared by the Ka Lahui Hawaii Mokuna (elected legislature) in 1994 can now be read on this website. Click on the “Hookupu Master Plan” tab above.

I am proud to say I was present in Keaukaha at that legislative session to witness how brilliantly the citizens crafted the document and how hard they worked. It was awesome to experience collaboration and hear the vision of Native Hawaiians so passionately articulated.

It marked a turning point for Ka Lahui Hawaii, because, as it states on page 1, Ka Lahui Hawaii gifted this plan “for future work in many political and community spheres and to propose a process of consensus building which can meet the needs of the many sovereign groups in Hawaii.” “Hookupu” means “offering.”

Now, 15 years later, here it is again, offered and accessible on the internet. I hope you will take time to read it.

Posted by Rebekah

Status of Hawaiian sovereignty in talks 10/24

Information just reached our desk about three panel discussions on Hawaiian sovereignty issues occurring this Saturday, October 24, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies. The theme is “‘Ike: Historical Transformations: Reading Hawaii’s Past to Probe Its Future.” Details are listed on the Calendar of Events page. The event is free to the public.

Akaka bill and Ka Lahui Hawaii position explained

The initial release of a position statement by the Ka Lahui Hawaii Working Group on the H.R. 2314 and S. 1011 Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act of 2009, is now posted on the Position Statements page of this website. It begins:

“The Ka Lahui Hawai`i Working Group declares its opposition to H.R. 2314 and S. 1011 – Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act of 2009, otherwise known as the Akaka Bill.  Since its inception in 1987, Ka Lahui Hawai`i has continuously advocated for federal recognition, however there are serious concerns with the process and current version of this bill.”

Citizens may familiarize themselves with the position statement. Citizens also may be interested in the following program sponsored by the Native Hawaiian Bar Association to become more informed:

An update on H.R. 2314, the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act, known as the Akaka bill, and other Native Hawaiian issues will be the topic of The Native Hawaiian Bar Association Luncheon from 12 noon to 1:30 p.m., October 20, 2009, at Goodsill Anderson Quinn & Stifel, Ali`i Place 20th Floor, 1099 Alakea Street, Honolulu.

Hawaii Congressman Neil Abercrombie will be the speaker. Abercrombie is the sponsor of H.R. 2314 pending in the U.S. House of Representatives. Cost of an optional Hawaiian plate lunch is $10, payable at the door, starting at 11:45 a.m.  Please make reservations by emailing karenjones@hawaii.rr.com by October 15, 2009.

Please make checks for lunch payable to Native Hawaiian Bar Association. Send registration info and payment to: Law Office of Yuklin Aluli, 415-C Uluniu Street, Kailua, HI 96734, Attention: Karen Jones, Secretary. For more information, phone (808) 262-5900 or fax (808) 262-5610.

If you order lunch, you must pay whether or not you attend. As an option, you may bring your own lunch.