Archive for the ‘indigenous people’ Tag

Lono i ka Makahiki!

Aloha! Pehea oe? Recall that Makahiki season is here! In Hawaii citizens still observe the festival that runs roughly from mid-October to mid-February. Check the sky at night, and you’ll see the Makalii constellation (Pleiades) overhead at 8 p.m. Work is pau, the food has been harvested. People play sports, play games, have ceremonies honoring Lono, the god of agriculture and harvesting. Warring ceases; the time of Ku is passed. Many other indigenous cultures observe this time of year similarly as winter approaches and families visit and entertain each other with good relaxing times.

Today my ohana plans to attend Makahiki Festivities at Queen Liliuokalani Children’s Center, 53-516 Kamehameha Highway, in Punaluu, Oahu. Protocol began at sunrise, so we’ve missed that. However, the games for all ages begin at 9 a.m., and they are open to the public. I suggest you find out what might be going on in your area, or come to Punaluu, or organize some festivities yourself. Enjoy!

Posted by Rebekah  

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Healing our spirit worldwide

You might like the “Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – The Sixth Gathering” on Oahu now until September 10, 2010. The welcome ceremony took place today. A festival at Waimea Valley on Oahu is on tap for Sept. 4, and opening ceremonies are scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 5, at Kualoa Park, Oahu. Conference sessions start Sept. 6 at the Hawaii Convention Center, Kalakaua avenue and Kapiolani boulevard. Registration fees apply, the same for one day or one week, but inquire about discounts. Please click on the underscored link above for all the information.

Posted by Rebekah

Ka Lahui Hawaii’s master plan for Hawaiian sovereignty

A master plan for Hawaiian sovereignty prepared by the Ka Lahui Hawaii Mokuna (elected legislature) in 1994 can now be read on this website. Click on the “Hookupu Master Plan” tab above.

I am proud to say I was present in Keaukaha at that legislative session to witness how brilliantly the citizens crafted the document and how hard they worked. It was awesome to experience collaboration and hear the vision of Native Hawaiians so passionately articulated.

It marked a turning point for Ka Lahui Hawaii, because, as it states on page 1, Ka Lahui Hawaii gifted this plan “for future work in many political and community spheres and to propose a process of consensus building which can meet the needs of the many sovereign groups in Hawaii.” “Hookupu” means “offering.”

Now, 15 years later, here it is again, offered and accessible on the internet. I hope you will take time to read it.

Posted by Rebekah

Constitution of Ka Lahui Hawaii

The “Constitution of Ka Lahui Hawaii”  may be viewed by clicking on the tab in the menu bar and following instructions to the link. The Constitution was originally published in 1993 on newsprint stock.

It is a long document, and the upload may take a few moments depending on your internet connection speed. It is best viewed with the browser Firefox. See sidebar at right.

Mahalo to the authors of the Constitution and the Ka Lahui citizens who made this publication possible.

Posted by Rebekah

Status of Hawaiian sovereignty in talks 10/24

Information just reached our desk about three panel discussions on Hawaiian sovereignty issues occurring this Saturday, October 24, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies. The theme is “‘Ike: Historical Transformations: Reading Hawaii’s Past to Probe Its Future.” Details are listed on the Calendar of Events page. The event is free to the public.