Archive for the ‘Hawaii’ Tag

Kue petition revisited

A peaceful demonstration to inform the public about the petitions protesting the annexation of the Hawaiian nation to the United States in 1897 by Hawaiian nationals was held Monday, Feb. 21, at the statue of U.S. President William McKinley, the statue of President McKinley holding a “Treaty of Annexation” that never was.

You may read the story and view photos at http://www.hawaiianindependencealliance.org/category/eventsactions/

The petitions against annexation were circulated by Hui Kalaiaina, Hui Aloha Aina for Men, and Hui Aloha Aina for Women. At the time the population was less than 40,000. More than 38,000 signatures are on the combined petitions, indicating overwhelming opposition. In 1997 the petitions were retrieved from the U.S. National Archives in Washington, D.C., and brought back to Hawaii by Noenoe K. Silva who informed present-day Native Hawaiians of their ancestors’ position.

You may read Dr. Silva’s findings at http://libweb.hawaii.edu/digicoll/annexation/pet-intro.html

Posted by Rebekah

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Lono i ka Makahiki!

Aloha! Pehea oe? Recall that Makahiki season is here! In Hawaii citizens still observe the festival that runs roughly from mid-October to mid-February. Check the sky at night, and you’ll see the Makalii constellation (Pleiades) overhead at 8 p.m. Work is pau, the food has been harvested. People play sports, play games, have ceremonies honoring Lono, the god of agriculture and harvesting. Warring ceases; the time of Ku is passed. Many other indigenous cultures observe this time of year similarly as winter approaches and families visit and entertain each other with good relaxing times.

Today my ohana plans to attend Makahiki Festivities at Queen Liliuokalani Children’s Center, 53-516 Kamehameha Highway, in Punaluu, Oahu. Protocol began at sunrise, so we’ve missed that. However, the games for all ages begin at 9 a.m., and they are open to the public. I suggest you find out what might be going on in your area, or come to Punaluu, or organize some festivities yourself. Enjoy!

Posted by Rebekah  

Constitution of Ka Lahui Hawaii

The “Constitution of Ka Lahui Hawaii”  may be viewed by clicking on the tab in the menu bar and following instructions to the link. The Constitution was originally published in 1993 on newsprint stock.

It is a long document, and the upload may take a few moments depending on your internet connection speed. It is best viewed with the browser Firefox. See sidebar at right.

Mahalo to the authors of the Constitution and the Ka Lahui citizens who made this publication possible.

Posted by Rebekah

Funds accepted by Pono Kaulike, Inc.

It is Makahiki and a time to rest, survey the harvest, and make contributions. It is a time to give and receive! The non-profit organization Pono Kaulike, Inc., accepts tax-deductible charitable donations to fund our programs and projects. If you wish, you may designate your contribution to Ka Lahui Hawaii to further the native initiative for sovereignty. Mail to Pono Kaulike, Inc., P.O. Box 4964, Hilo, HI 96720. Mahalo! Lono i ka Makahiki!

Posted by Rebekah

Noho Hewa on screen tonight

The award-winning film will be screened again tonight.

Time: October 8, 2009 from 7pm to 9pm
Location: Windward Community College
Organized By: Koolaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club & Windward Community
College Hawaiian Studies Program
Event Description:
Winner of the Best Documentary Award at the Hawaii International Film
Festival (2008), will be showing at Windward Community College on
October 8th, at 7PM at the Paliku Theater. This screening is FREE to
all and is being sponsored by the Koolaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club and
Windward Community College Hawaiian Studies Program.

Recently completed and now available on DVD, the film is 10 minutes
longer than the unfinished version seen by standing room only crowds
last winter in Hawai’i and it has just finished a tour of Aotearoa
(New Zealand).

“Noho Hewa” ia about the most challenging issues facing Hawaiians
today: Akaka Bill vs. Independence, desecration of Hawaiian Burials
and sacred sites, GMO’S, militarism, poverty and U.S. economy and
culture used to ethnically cleanse Hawai’i of the Kanaka Oiwi. Filmed
over the course of 6 years, “Noho Hewa” is unambiguous, raw, and
emotional… it is the truth about Hawai’i.